Three Questions

1. What tasks have you completed recently? 

Recently, I have completed catch up notes in physics, research for an importnat paper in English, and multiple Chemistry assignments (Phets, UT homework, lab conclusions, etc.). Specifically, I have reviewed UT homework 15 to get prepared for the upcoming test, and I have reviewed notes on electron configurations.

2. What have you learned recently?

Recently, I have learned about quantum numbers, orbital diagrams, and electron configuration principles. Also, I have learned about what factors impact the amount of energy required to remove an electron from an atom.

3. What are you struggling with &, therefore, plan to do next?

Currently, I am struggling with understanding the basic concepts behind electron configurations and how those configurations determine ionization energy and atomic radius. Therefore, I plan to review notes and UT homework to hopefully build a better base knowledge.

Advertisements

Shells Activity

In chemistry, Coulomb’s law relates the energy to the distance of electrons from the nucleus of an atom, and the charges present from the charged particles. The relationship is inverse, meaning the further away from the nucleus, the less energy it takes to remove an electron. The charge is also pertinent, as it impacts the equation supporting Coulumb’s law (E= charge/distance). Unlike energy and distance, energy and charge are directly related.

Similar to chemical bonds, the removal of an electron requires activation energy to overcome the attractive forces between the positive and negative charged particles. This makes the process endothermic, instead of exothermic. The amount of energy required to move an electron is dependent on how the electrons are organized within an atom. For example, if an atom is buffered, or shielded, by two electrons in a lower orbital, the atom will experience less less positive charge because it is further away from the nucleus. The other electrons absorb most of the positive force exerted by protons in the nucleus, making it easier to remove.

The energy required to remove an electron is much larger than that needed to excite an electron. Electron excitement simply moves the electron up a shell level, while electron removal takes it completely out of the atom, which is much more difficult to do.

Sources:

http://maxwells-equations.com/fields/charges.gif

http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/@api/deki/files/8850/Bohr_Model_of_the_Hydrogen_Atom.jpg

Three Questions 1/16/15

1. What tasks have you completed recently? 

Recently, I have completed many Calculus review assignments, chemistry practice problems, and many online history assignments.

2. What have you learned recently?

Recently, I have learned how to calculate the volume of cylindrical shells in calculus, and in chemistry, I have learned what makes a reaction spontaneous, how to use Hess’s law, and how to calculate enthalpy.

3. What are you struggling with &, therefore, plan to do next?

Currently, I am struggling with the concepts of work, calorimetry, entropy, and energy and voltage. I plan to review my notes and practice problems over the weekend in order to gain a better understanding of these concepts before taking the test on Tuesday.